Growth and reproductive performance of broodstock shrimp reared in a biosecure recirculating aquaculture system versus a flow-through pond


C.A. Otoshi, S.M. Arce, S.M. Moss-2003 
Aquacultural Engineering, 29(3-4): 93-107

Abstract:

Over the past decade, viral pathogens have caused mass mortalities of farmed shrimp throughout the major shrimp farming regions of the world. In addition, the global shrimp farming industry has been criticized for negatively impacting coastal environments. These issues have raised concerns about the sustainability of traditional shrimp farming practices, and have prompted farmers and researchers to develop biosecure technologies that promote a sustainable industry. Current technologies include the use of specific pathogen free (SPF) shrimp that are grown to market size in recirculating systems that rely on pathogen exclusion. Inherent in this approach is the need to produce SPF broodstock under biosecure conditions. However, there is a paucity of information on broodstock growth and reproductive performance when they are reared in recirculating systems. The present investigation compares shrimp growth and reproductive performance in two trials where shrimp were cultured from market size (~20 g) to broodstock size (~4060 g) in a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) versus a flow-through earthen pond (EP). In trial 1, mean growth rates of males and females in the RAS were 0.83 and 1.33 g/week, respectively. In the EP, males and females grew 1.07 and 1.48 g/week, respectively. In trial 2, mean growth rates of males and females in the RAS were 0.90 and 1.53 g/week, respectively, whereas in the EP, males and females grew and 1.24 and 1.78 g/week. Slower growth rates in the RAS may be attributed to the lack of natural productivity, which provides supplemental nutrition to the shrimp. In addition to growth rates, reproductive performance of broodstock reared in the RAS was compared with historical reproductive performance of broodstock reared in the EP. Data on spawning success and production of viable nauplii revealed no significant differences (P>0.05) between broodstock shrimp reared in these two systems. These results indicate that broodstock shrimp can be cultured in a biosecure RAS while maintaining good growth and high survival. In addition, reproductive performance of broodstock shrimp reared in a RAS is not compromised when compared with broodstock shrimp reared in a conventional, flow-through pond.

(The Oceanic Institute, 41-202 Kalanianaole Hwy., Waimanalo, HI 96795, USA, e-mail: cotoshi@oceanicinstitute.org)


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